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Tuesday, May 19, 2020 | History

2 edition of Ordovician and Silurian graptolites from China found in the catalog.

Ordovician and Silurian graptolites from China

YuМ€n-chu Sun

Ordovician and Silurian graptolites from China

by YuМ€n-chu Sun

  • 66 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Geological Survey of China in Peiping (Peking) .
Written in English

    Places:
  • China.
    • Subjects:
    • Graptolites.,
    • Paleontology -- China.,
    • Paleontology -- Ordovician.,
    • Paleontology -- Silurian.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Y.C. Sun ...
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsQE756.C6 A3 ser. B, vol. 14, fasc. 1
      The Physical Object
      Pagination69, [1] p.; 1 p. l., 5 p.
      Number of Pages69
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL253670M
      LC Control Numbergs 38000168
      OCLC/WorldCa20616669

      Paleoclimate records indicate global cooling during ∼35 m.y. of the Early and Middle Ordovician, a relatively stable climate in the ∼8-m.y.-long Katian Age, and a glacial maximum in the Hirnantian Age (– Ma) (Trotter et al., ; Finnegan et al., ; Melchin et al., ).Cooling likely resulted in the establishment of ice sheets on polar Gondwana in the Katian Age or even Cited by: Ordovician and Silurian Graptolite Succession in the Trail Creek Area, Central Idaho: A Graptolite Zone Reference Section: Usgs Professional Paper [Carter, Claire, Churkin, Michael] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ordovician and Silurian Graptolite Succession in the Trail Creek Area, Central Idaho: A Graptolite Zone Reference Section: Usgs Professional Paper Authors: Michael Churkin, Claire Carter.

        The second largest Phanerozoic mass extinction occurred at the Ordovician-Silurian (O-S) boundary. However, unlike the other major mass extinction events, the driver for Cited by: The Ordovician generic α-diversity change of brachiopods, trilobites, graptolites and acritar chs of South China, and their comparison with the integrated trend of South China and the world.

        There are few sponges known from the end-Ordovician to early-Silurian strata all over the world and no records of sponge fossils have been found yet in China Cited by:   The Yichang area of Hubei Province, China provides important information on Lower to Middle Ordovician fossil faunas and is a center for research on Ordovician graptolites due to the sometimes excellent preservation of the copiously available material. New material collected during a research project on Lower to Middle Ordovician biota in the Yichang Region provided among others Cited by: 4.


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Ordovician and Silurian graptolites from China by YuМ€n-chu Sun Download PDF EPUB FB2

The result of nearly 30 years of stratigraphic investigations in Northwest China, Darriwilian to Katian (Ordovician) Graptolites from Northwest China is a systematic palaeontology of species belonging to 45 genera through the mid-Darriwilian to early Katian periods, illustrated with taxonomic, stratigraphic, and biogeographic : $ Description Darriwilian to Sandbian (Ordovician) Graptolites from Northwest China analyzes the significance of these exquisite, mostly pyritic, graptolites of the middle to late Ordovician period from North China and Tarim, China—locations that have developed the world’s most complete successions of strata and fossil records.

Xu Chen, Yuandong Zhang, in Darriwilian to Katian (Ordovician) Graptolites from Northwest China, Ordovician graptolites have been described from the Qaidam (Chaidam) Basin and the Qilianshan Mts.

by Mu et al. () and Mu ().The corresponding graptolite faunas of these areas are correlated in the present study based on a restudy by Chen et al.

() and his unpublished data. Darriwilian to Sandbian (Ordovician) Graptolites from Northwest China analyzes the significance of these exquisite, mostly pyritic, graptolites of the middle to late Ordovician period from North.

Darriwilian to Katian (Ordovician) Graptolites from Northwest China. (Book). Elsevier, Waltham MA, and Zhejiang University Press, Hangzhou, China.

Goldman, D., Nõlvak, J., and Maletz, J. Mid to Late Ordovician Graptolite and Chitinozoan Biostratigraphy of the Kandava Drill Core in Western Latvia. GFF Chen, X. et al. Late Ordovician to earliest Silurian graptolite and brachiopod biozonation from the Yangtze region, South China, with a global correlation.

Geol. Mag.– ().Author: Dongping Hu. Graptolites show high rates of taxonomic turnover during this time interval. Most previous studies of the Late Ordovician graptolite extinction (e.g., Melchin and Mitchell,Koren',Koren' and Bjerreskov, ) were based on attempts at global compilation of data from many separate sections and different zonal schemes.

The range data Cited by: Age and graptolite zones for the Ordovician–Silurian transition (A, Chen et al., ; Cooper and Sadler, ; Melchin et al., ); high-resolution correlation of Qiliao section (B) and Wangjiawan GSSP section (C) based on lithology, biostratigraphy and organic carbon isotope.

F = Formation, by: Graptolithina is a subclass of the class Pterobranchia, the members of which are known as organisms are colonial animals known chiefly as fossils from the Middle Cambrian (Miaolingian, Wuliuan) through the Lower Carboniferous (Mississippian). A possible early graptolite, Chaunograptus, is known from the Middle Cambrian.

One analysis suggests that the pterobranch Class: Pterobranchia. Darriwilian to Sandbian (Ordovician) Graptolites from Northwest China analyzes the significance of these exquisite, mostly pyritic, graptolites of the middle to late Ordovician period from North China and Tarim, China—locations that have developed the world’s most.

The Ordovician (/ ɔːr. d ə ˈ v ɪ ʃ. ə n,-d oʊ-,-ˈ v ɪ ʃ. ə n / or-də-VISH-ee-ən, -⁠doh- -⁠ VISH-ən) is a geologic period and system, the second of six periods of the Paleozoic Ordovician spans million years from the end of the Cambrian Period million years ago (Mya) to the start of the Silurian Period Mya.

The Ordovician, named after the Welsh Mean atmospheric CO content over period duration:. The graptolite faunas obtained from several Ordovician-Silurian boundary sequences in south China suggest that environmental conditions favored by many graptolites persisted longer in south China than in Dob's Linn in the Late Ordovician (Mu, ; Berry et al., ).

Notes on the Graptolite Faunas of the Upper Ordovician and Lower Silurian - Volume 66 Issue 1 - K. DaviesCited by:   Late Ordovician to earliest Silurian graptolite and brachiopod biozonation from the Yangtze region, South China, with a global correlation - Volume Issue 6 - CHEN XU, RONG JIAYU, CHARLES E.

MITCHELL, DAVID A. HARPER, FAN JUNXUAN, ZHAN RENBIN, ZHANG YUANDONG, LI RONGYU, WANG YICited by: The boundary between the Ordovician and the Silurian has been designated as the base of the Parakidograptus acuminatus graptolite zone by international agreement.

Dobs Linn, near Moffat, in southern Scotland is the type locality for that boundary. There, black graptolite. Graptolite, any member of an extinct group of small, aquatic colonial animals that first became apparent during the Cambrian Period ( million to million years ago) and that persisted into the Early Carboniferous Period ( million to million years ago).

Graptolites were floating animals that have been most frequently preserved as carbonaceous impressions on black shales, but their. Ordovician-Silurian extinction, global extinction event occurring during the Hirnantian Age ( million to million years ago) of the Ordovician Period and the subsequent Rhuddanian Age ( million to million years ago) of the Silurian Period that eliminated an estimated 85 percent of all Ordovician species.

This extinction interval ranks second in severity to the one that. Late Ordovician to earliest Silurian graptolite and brachiopod biozonation from the Yangtze region, South China, with a global by: 4. A thick succession of black to greenish, fine to silty shales and siltstones with a variable amount of poorly to well‐preserved graptolite faunas ranges from the upper Ordovician Dicellograptus ornatus Biozone (upper Katian) to the lower Silurian Lituigraptus convolutus Biozone (mid Aeronian).

The Ordovician-Silurian Wufeng-Longmaxi formation in South China has received extensive attention due to the presence of graptolites. Abundant graptolites were observed in the core and outcrop samples.

Graptolite fragments and solid bitumen were the dominant form of organic by:. 1. Introduction. The Silurian rocks of Mojiang, Yunnan have been studied since the s. The Regional Geological Survey of Yunnan () established the Mojiang Group as encompassing the whole of the Silurian.

The next Regional Geological Survey of Yunnan () reported graptolites from this group, and divided this group into three parts that were considered as the Lower, Middle and Upper Cited by: 9.Graptolites from the Ordovician–Silurian boundary sections of the Yichang area, W. Hubei. In Stratigraphy and Paleontology of Systemic Boundaries in China.

Ordovician–Silurian Boundary (1), Cited by: Four sections of the lower part of the Cape Phillips Formation, two outcrops on northeastern Cornwallis Island and one outcrop and one drill core from Truro Island, Northwest Territories, Canada, provide significant new data on the Ordovician–Silurian boundary.

They show evidence of continuous sedimentation through the boundary interval and a continuous sequence of graptolite zones.